Sep 19

Technology and programming languages for DH projects

(Proposals and areas of interest from participants as indicated on the THATCamp registration form.)

* As a developer, I’m interested in collaborative development practices and in the new kinds of scholarly products enabled by APIs, Linked Data, social media, and other new technologies.

* I’ve been out of the humanities research arena for quite a while, would like to get a picture of where things are going. I’ve been working on an idea to harvest OAI repository record sets with an eye to making a sort of freely downloadable corpus of bibliographic records — an OAIster you could run/play with/analyze locally. Also would like to discuss NoSQL databases (e.g., MongoDB, CouchDB) as a platform for an institutional repository software system.

* I’d like to learn to create Zotero translators. I tried it using available tutorials and got stuck. I am the chief Zotero support person on my campus but have very limited programming skills (learned HTML in 1997, have taught myself a little CSS, do NOT know Javascript or Java or Flash programming)

* I would like to become more fluent in TEI and learn its extensive capabilities, and learn more about creating web content in order to build archives and databases for texts and alternate-media translations of those texts. I would also like to explore a programming language, since I have almost no experience in that realm. Since I am applying to graduate programs in digital humanities for next year, I am particularly eager to meet and start building connections with new and long-time members of the field through this THATCamp.

1 comment

  1. Scott Hanrath

    I’ve also been thinking about dipping into the NoSQL waters. I don’t have practical experiences to share, but a general discussion of how and where NoSQL is advantageous would be of interest to me.

    Along the Linked Data line, I’d be interested in real or potenial uses of things like Freebase(http://wiki.freebase.com/wiki/Developers), dbPedia (dbpedia.org/About), or the NY Times LOD (data.nytimes.com/, data.nytimes.com/86910677781001313522) to enrich DH projects.

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